the
Literary Saloon

the literary
weblog at the
complete review


about the saloon

support the site

archive

cr
crQ
crF

RSS

Twitter

The Complete Review Guide to Contemporary World Fiction by M.A.Orthofer
The CR Guide

the Complete Review: the book - A Site History
The CR:the book

to e-mail us:


literary weblogs:

  Books, Inq.
  Bookninja
  BookRiot
  Critical Mass
  Guardian Books
  The Millions
  MobyLives
  NewPages Weblog
  Omnivoracious
  Page-Turner
  PowellsBooks.Blog
  Three Percent

  Perlentaucher
  Rép. des livres

  Arts & Letters Daily
  Bookdwarf
  Buzzwords
  The Millions
  The Rumpus
  Two Words
  Waggish

  See also: links page






saloon statistics

the Literary Saloon at the Complete Review
opinionated commentary on literary matters - from the complete review


27 September 2020 - Sunday

Q & As: Marilynne Robinson - Kim Stanley Robinson | Translation in ... Turkey

       Q & A: Marilynne Robinson

       At The Guardian Julian Coman has a Q & A with Marilynne Robinson: 'America still has a democratic soul'.
       She admits: "I don't really understand the phenomenon of social media".
       She has a new novel out, Jack -- see the publicity pages at Farrar, Straus and Giroux and Virago, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.
       The only Robinson title under review at the complete review is Absence of Mind.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Q & A: Kim Stanley Robinson

       At Public Books John Plotz has a Q & A, The Realism of Our Times: Kim Stanley Robinson on How Science Fiction Works.

       Two of Robinson's trilogies are under review at the complete review -- see e.g. Red Mars and Forty Signs of Rain.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Translation in ... Turkey

       At Anadolu Agency Handan Kazanci reports on how Skilled, speedy translators give Turkish book lovers the best of both worlds.
       I am not sure about that enthusiasm about speed .....
       A few interesting odds and ends strewn in, however -- including some numbers: "2019 saw nearly 9,100 translations, and this year through July alone, over 6,000 books were translated into Turkish from other tongues".

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



26 September 2020 - Saturday

Iranian essentials | JCB Prize for Literature shortlist
Degrees review

       Iranian essentials

       At the Asian American Writers' Worshop's The Margins Niloufar Talebi has a five-part series on '100 Essential Books by Iranian Writers'.
       The Introduction (which then includes the non-fiction selections) is well worth reading, discussing some of the difficulties behind why works by Iranian authors are not as widely available in English as one might expect and hope.
       As to the selections themselves: each author only gets one title -- "to allow this list to contain as many different writers as possible" -- and: "For the most part, these books have been published between 2000-2020". Most disappointingly, a significant percentage of the titles were written in languages other than Persian -- and practically all of those in English, at that. Still, it's a decent selection: the fiction list covers most of the significant authors available in English, and the list of Classics in Translation usefully mentions the variety of translation of specific works on offer. All in all, a quite useful resource (even if it is so annoyingly spread out over five pages .....)
       Many of these titles are under review at the complete review.

       Conveniently, too, Qantara.de just published a Q & A by Gerrit Wustmann with Iranian translator Mahmoud Hosseini Zad: "about his work and the current situation in Iran", A naked image of the truth.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       JCB Prize for Literature shortlist

       They've announced the five-title shortlist for this year's JCB Prize for Literature, the leading Indian fiction prize, paying out ₹25,00,000.
       One of the titles is a work in translation -- Moustache, by S. Hareesh, translated from the Malayalam by Jayasree Kalathil; see also the HarperCollins India publicity page.
       The winner will be announced 7 November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Degrees review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Michel Butor's Degrees.

       This 1960 novel -- first published in English translation in 1961 -- was re-issued by Dalkey Archive Press in 2004, and my review copy actually dates to back then. Yes, at 5740 days -- it arrived in the early days of January, 2005 -- it's taken me quite a while to get to ..... (But, see: just because I don't get to a book immediately doesn't mean I won't eventually .....)

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



25 September 2020 - Friday

Ilf and Petrov | Wilhelm Raabe-Literaturpreis
Canada's Frankfurt Book Fair Virtual Program

       Ilf and Petrov

       At Russia Beyond Alexandra Guzeva profiles Ilf and Petrov: The USSR's most funny and daring writing duo.
       Two Ilf and Petrov novels are under review at the complete review: The Golden Calf and The Twelve Chairs.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Wilhelm Raabe-Literaturpreis

       They've announced that this year's Wilhelm Raabe-Literaturpreis goes to Die Dame mit der bemalten Hand by Christine Wunnicke, which she'll receive on 28 November.
       Die Dame mit der bemalten Hand is also one of the finalists for this year's German Book Prize, which will be awarded 12 October.
       While the German Book Prize is probably the more high-profile German book award, the Wilhelm Raabe Prize actually pays out more -- €30,000 to the German Book Prize's €25,000.
       Wunnicke's The Fox and Dr. Shimamura came out in English last year; I expect we'll see this one in English sooner rather than later as well.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Canada's Frankfurt Book Fair Virtual Program

       Like everything else, this year's Guest of Honour-porgramme at the Frankfurt Book Fair was upended by events and so now Canada gets another year to prepare for the role -- but they're also offering a virtual presence for this year's book fair, which includes a limited program
       I'm not sure about that 'Singular Plurality' slogan .....

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



24 September 2020 - Thursday

Prix Laure-Bataillon | FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award shortlist
New Hungarian books | The Disaster Tourist review

       Prix Laure-Bataillon

       They've announced the winner of this year's prix Laure-Bataillon, a €10,000 prize for the best translation of a work into French, and it goes to François-Michel Durazzo's translation from the Catalan, of Miquel de Palol's El Testament d'Alcestis; see the Livres Hebdo report, as well as the publicity pages for the book from Grup62 and Zulma, as well as the Carmen Balcells information page.
       The prize will be awarded 21 November; see also the impressive list of previous winners.
       (And, yes, it's about time we saw some Miquel de Palol in English .....)

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award shortlist

       They've announced the six-title shortlist for this year's £30,000 FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award.
       The winner will be announced 1 December.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       New Hungarian books

       At hlo they offer a list and overview of 10 New Books from 2020 published in Hungary -- some of which will hopefully make it into English at some point.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Disaster Tourist review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Yun Ko-eun's The Disaster Tourist, out recently in English from Serpent's Tail (in the UK) and Counterpoint (in the US).

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



23 September 2020 - Wednesday

Prix Jean-Monnet de littérature européenne | Cundill History Prize shortlist

       Prix Jean-Monnet de littérature européenne

       They've announced the winner of this year's prix Jean-Monnet de littérature européenne, a French best-book prize for a work by a European author written in or translated into French, and the prize will go to the French translation of Almudena Grandes' Los pacientes del doctor García -- see, for example, the Tusquets publicity page --, which beat out Anne-Marie Garat's La nuit atlantique and Ian McEwan's Machines Like Me. No word yet at the official site, last I checked, but see, for example, the Livres Hebdo report.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Cundill History Prize shortlist

       They've announced the ten title shortlist (which actually functions as a longlist ...) for this year's Cundill History Prize, "the world's leading history prize", paying out US$75,000 to the winner.
       The finalists -- surely the real shortlist -- will be announced 20 October, and the winner in late November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



22 September 2020 - Tuesday

Cena Franze Kafky | Royal Society Science Book Prize shortlist
The Bookshop review

       Cena Franze Kafky

       They've announced that Milan Kundera will get this year's Franz Kafka Prize, the leading Czech international author prize; see also, for example, Pavel Burian on Milan Kundera wins Franz Kafka Prize at CzechPoints.

       Previous winners include Nobel laureates Elfriede Jelinek (2004) and Harold Pinter (2005), who famously were announced as winners of this prize in the same year but before they were awarded the Nobel Prize, and Peter Handke (2009), as well as Philip Roth, Haruki Murakami, and Margaret Atwood, among others.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Royal Society Science Book Prize shortlist

       They've announced the six-title shortlist for this year's Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize -- not yet at the official site, last I checked, but see, for example, Mark Chandler's report in The Bookseller, Bryson and Vince make Royal Society Science Book Prize shortlist.
       The winner will be announced on 3 November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Bookshop review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Penelope Fitzgerald's 1978 Booker Prize-shortlisted novel, The Bookshop.

       The French translation of this was originally published as L'affaire Lolita, which strikes me as a rather desperate gambit; yes, the bookshop owner does spend some time considering whether or not she should stock the then-new Nabokov novel -- and winds up really stocking up on it -- but there's a whole lot more to the novel. I have to think that there were a lot of readers who were expecting something very different. (They did re-title it, as La libraire, a decade later, when the movie version was set to come out.)

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



21 September 2020 - Monday

ACFNY Translation Prize open for submissions | JCB Jury Q & A
Xiaolu Guo profile | The Peach Blossom Fan review

       ACFNY Translation Prize open for submissions

       The 2020 ACFNY Translation Prize, awarded "for an outstanding translation of contemporary Austrian literature (prose) into English" is open for submissions -- a sample translation (10 pages/ca. 4,000 words) of a translation of a work of prose by a living Austrian author published in the original German after 1989 -- through 31 October. Spread the word !
       The winning translator: "will be invited to work on a full translation which is expected to be finished by mid-2021", which is then scheduled to be published by New Vessel Press in 2022.
       (And, yes, I am one of the jurors.)

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       JCB Jury Q & A

       At Scroll.in Sana Goyal has a JCB Jury interview: 'All these books are going to change conversations for better or worse', a Q & A with Aruni Kashyap and Tejaswini Niranjana, two of the jurors for this year's JCB Prize for Literature.
       Among the observations:
Translation of literature from Indian languages is here to stay, and it is slowly reclaiming and demanding its long-deserved place. But, while reading the entries, I also felt that we need a lot more good translators -- in all languages.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Xiaolu Guo profile

       A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers-author Xiaolu Guo has a new book coming out -- A Lover's Discourse; get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk -- and in Prospect Rebecca Liu profiles her, in Xiaolu Guo's half-familiar fictions.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Peach Blossom Fan review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of K'ung Shang-jen's 1699 play The Peach Blossom Fan, re-issued a couple of years ago by New York Review Books.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



20 September 2020 - Sunday

Translating the Future conference | Ngũgĩ's Premi Internacional Catalunya

       Translating the Future conference

       The Translating the Future conference and conversation series, commemorating and carrying forward PEN's 1970 World of Translation conference, has been running since May and finishes next week.
       Videos of all the conversations in the series are available at the site -- as are archival audio recordings from the 1970 conference ! And you can watch this week's promising-sounding events when they happen .....
       An incredible amount of material here.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Ngũgĩ's Premi Internacional Catalunya

       Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o was recently awarded the Premi Internacional Catalunya -- and gave his acceptance speech in Gikuyu; you can watch the whole ceremony here (yes, there are subtitles).
       This was generally well-received in the press -- see, for example, Stephanie Wangari's Ngugi wa Thiong'o Feted in Catalonia, Makes Speech in Kikuyu at Kenyans.co.ke, or Wairimu Nderitu on how Without our own language, our experiences are lost, so are we in The East African -- but I'm surprised to see some backlash too, including regarding his choice of language: in The Citizen Enock Matundura, for example, argues: Ngugi should have spoken in Kiswahili when taking prize. Meanwhile, Henry Indangasi in Nation even goes so far as to try to make a case Why Ngugi should have rejected Catalonia prize -- and, for good measure, advises: "the celebrated novelist to stop the melodrama of addressing international audiences in his mother tongue Gikuyu" .....

       Ngũgĩ's latest translation of his own work from the Gikuyu is due out in the US and UK shortly, The Perfect Nine -- certainly one of the most anticipated translations of the fall season, and one I will be getting to soon. See also publicity pages from The New Press and Harvill, or pre-order your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



19 September 2020 - Saturday

National Book Award for Fiction longlist
Premio de Literaturas Indígenas de América

       National Book Award for Fiction longlist

       The (American) National Book Foundation has announced the ten-title longlist for this year's National Book Award for Fiction.
       The ten were selected from 388 (unfortunately and outrageously not revealed) submissions -- down from 397 last year. (By comparison, there were 609 submission for the Nonfiction award, up from last year's 600.)
       I have not seen any of these .....
       The finalists will be announced on 6 October, and the winner on 18 November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Premio de Literaturas Indígenas de América

       They've announced the winner of this year's Premio de Literaturas Indígenas de América, Mex$250,000 prize for an unpublished work in an indigenous language, and it's Isoñil ja’al by Ch'ol author Peñate Montejo, selected from 60 entries from nine countries. (The genre that is honored changes from year to year; this was a poetry year.)
       The prize will be awarded on 4 December at this year's Guadalajara International Book Fair.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



18 September 2020 - Friday

Martin Amis and Salman Rushdie in conversation
Children's books in translation | Filosofía y letras review

       Martin Amis and Salman Rushdie in conversation

       Interview magazine has a conversation between Martin Amis and Salman Rushdie on Cancel Culture and The Hitch
       With Martin Amis' new novel Inside Story coming out shortly -- pre-order your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk -- that's the focus of the exchange. Lots of name-dropping, too.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Children's books in translation

       At Publishers Weekly Emma Kantor: "spoke with 10 acclaimed translators about the unique challenges and rewards of adapting international children's books for English-speaking readers", in Building Bridges: The Art of Children's Book Translation

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Filosofía y letras review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Pablo De Santis' Filosofía y letras. (Yes, this hasn't been translated into English yet.)

       Oddly, this is the third novel I've reviewed in recent weeks, after The Caretaker and Piranesi, in which the atmospheric locale -- the structure or building where the protagonist spends practically all his time -- plays an inordinately large role in the story. (And, as in Piranesi, flooding of the structure plays a significant role in the story.)

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



17 September 2020 - Thursday

National Book Award for Translated Literature longlist
Tim Wilkinson (1947-2020) | Bayerischer Buchpreis shortlists
Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize shortlist

       National Book Award for Translated Literature longlist

       The (American) National Book Foundation has announced the ten-title longlist for this year's National Book Award for Translated Literature.
       Only two of the titles are under review at the complete review:        The ten titles were selected from 130 (unfortunately and outrageously) not revealed submissions -- down more than 10 per cent from last year's 145 submissions. (They also announced the longlist for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature yesterday, and that had 311 submissions -- also down from last year (325) but not nearly as much.)
       Recall that for this prize both the author of the book and the translator had to be alive at the beginning of the eligibility period (1 December 2019), making for considerably fewer eligible books than, for example, for the Best Translated Book Award.
       Interesting to see World Edition place two titles on the list -- only New Directions also placed two, while quite a few of the leading translation-focused publishers were shut out, including Open Letter, New York Review Books, Dalkey Archive Press, and Deep Vellum.
       The finalists will be announced on 6 October, and the winner on 18 November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Tim Wilkinson (1947-2020)

       Translator from the Hungarian Tim Wilkinson has passed away; see, for example, the hlo report.

       Quite a few of his translations are under review at the complete review, notably the works of Kertész Imre and Szentkuthy Miklós (e.g. Marginalia on Casanova), as well as, for example, Captivity, by Spiró György.
       He was a great advocate for Hungarian literature in translation and will be sorely missed.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Bayerischer Buchpreis shortlists

       I had no idea there was a Bavarian Book Prize, but there is and they've now announced their shortlists.
       Two of the three fiction finalists were also longlisted for the German Book Prize (and the Dorothee Elmiger is now on the shortlist), but the one I've been hoping to see is from the non-fiction list, Jens Malte Fischer's enormous Karl Kraus-biography; see also the Zsolnay foreign rights information page.
       The winners will be announced on 19 November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize shortlist

       The American Literary Translators Association has announced the three-title shortlist for this year's Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize -- whereby the texts must be either poetry or source texts from Zen Buddhism.
       The winner will be announced 15 October.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



16 September 2020 - Wednesday

Shortlists: Booker Prize - German Book Prize
Prix Goncourt longlist | Europese Literatuurprijs
The Caretaker review

       Shortlist: Booker Prize

       They've announced the shortlist for this year's Booker Prize, the £50,000 prize for: "the best novel of the year written in English and published in the UK and Ireland" -- noteworthy this year for the absence of UK and Ireland authors on it .....
       The six finalists are:
  • Burnt Sugar, by Avni Doshi
  • The New Wilderness, by Diane Cook
  • Real Life, by Brandon Taylor
  • The Shadow King, by Maaza Mengiste
  • Shuggie Bain, by Douglas Stuart
  • This Mournable Body, by Tsitsi Dangarembga
       See also judge Sameer Rahim on Judging the Booker prize: 'These books are about living under intense pressure' at The Guardian.
       I haven't seen any of these; the only author under review at the complete review is Dangarembga (Nervous Conditions.)
       The winner will be announced 17 November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Shortlist: German Book Prize

       They've announced the shortlist for this year's German Book Prize, the leading German novel prize (basically: the German Booker Prize ...), and the six finalists are:
  • Annette, ein Heldinnenepos, by Anne Weber
  • Aus der Zuckerfabrik, by Dorothee Elmiger
  • Die Dame mit der bemalten Hand, by Christine Wunnicke
  • Herzfaden, by Thomas Hettche
  • Serpentinen, by Bov Bjerg
  • Streulicht, by Deniz Ohde
       I have (an e-copy of) the Wunnicke, and will probably try to have a look at the Weber (it's a novel in verse !).
       See also Sabine Peschel and Elizabeth Grenier's report at Deutsche Welle, German Book Prize 2020: The 6 finalists.
       The winner will be announced 12 October.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Prix Goncourt longlist

       The Académie Goncourt has announced the fifteen title-strong première sélection (warning ! dreaded pdf format !) -- the (first) longlist -- for the prix Goncourt, the leading French novel prize.
       The shorter longlist, or longer shortlist, will be announced 6 October, with the shortlist to follow on 27 October, and the winner on 10 November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Europese Literatuurprijs

       They've announced the winners of this year's Europese Literatuurprijs, a prize for the best translation into Dutch of a European novel.
       This year there was both an official jury prize -- which was won by Ali Smith's Spring -- and a student jury prize, which went to the Dutch translation of David Diop's At Night All Blood is Black (which is coming out in English translation in November, from Farrar, Straus and Giroux in the US and Pushkin Press in the UK).

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Caretaker review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Doon Arbus' debut novel, The Caretaker, just out from New Directions.

       This is the rare New Directions title with its very own official site.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



15 September 2020 - Tuesday

Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award | V&Q Books Q & A
Grand Prix de littérature américaine longlist

       Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award

       They've announced that this year's Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, a lifetime achievement award that is part of the Dayton Literary Peace Prizes, will go to Margaret Atwood. Apparently, however, she'll only get to pick it up next year, as they've postponed the awards gala until spring 2021.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       V&Q Books Q & A

       At Lizzy's Literary Life there's a Q & A with Katy Derbyshire on V&Q Books: Meet The Publisher and Book Designers -- the new publisher who: "will publish commercial, literary fiction and narrative non-fiction showcasing remarkable writing from Germany", V&Q Books.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Grand Prix de littérature américaine longlist

       Yes, the French have a prize for the best work of American fiction (in French translation), and this Grand Prix de littérature américaine has now announced its eight-title strong longlist; see, for example, the Livres Hebdo report.
       The three finalists will be announced on 26 October.

       They've also announced the longlists for this year's prix Femina, which has both a French and a translated novel category; there are eighteen French novels in the running, and fifteen translated ones; see the Livres Hebdo report.
       Lots of translations from the English on the translated list -- but interestingly not that much overlap with the Grand Prix de littérature américaine longlist.
       This is one of these four-round prizes, so there will be a shorter longlist (announced 2 October) and a shortlist (23 October) before they announce the winner on 3 November

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



14 September 2020 - Monday

'Painkili' fiction | The Career of Nicodemus Dyzma review

       'Painkili' fiction

       Via I'm pointed to Cris' story at The News Minute on The 'painkili' genre in Malayalam literature and how it captured the hearts of lakhs -- "cheesy love stories" that first became popular in the 1950s.
       A fascinating overview.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Career of Nicodemus Dyzma review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Tadeusz Dołęga-Mostowicz's 1932 novel, The Career of Nicodemus Dyzma, finally available in English, just out from Northwestern University Press.

       This novel is not entirely unknown, as it has repeatedly been mentioned as the (more-than-)inspiration behind Jerzy Kosiński's 1970 novel, Being There (itself then made into a Hal Ashby movie in 1979, starring Peter Sellers), but both these novels are worth considering on their own. And it's certainly good to finally have this in English.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



13 September 2020 - Sunday

Q & As: Ann Goldstein - Perumal Murugan | Tóth Árpád Műfordítói Díj

       Q & A: Ann Goldstein

       In The Observer Alex Preston has a Q & A with Elena Ferrante-translator Ann Goldstein: 'I try to make it really clear that I am not Elena Ferrante'.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Q & A: Perumal Murugan

       In the Deccan Herald Stanley Carvalho has a Q & A with One Part Woman-author Perumal Murugan, A Return to Defiance.
       He notes:
It makes me happy to see translations happening, but more should be done. It is very important to translate literature of all regional Indian languages not only because there are good books but also to achieve ‘unity in diversity’. There are good books in most Indian languages and an exchange between Indian languages must take place. As for Tamil literature, since 2000, there’s been a lot of emphasis on translation.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Tóth Árpád Műfordítói Díj

       The city of Budavár has announced the winner of this year's Árpád Tóth Translation Award, an award: 'given to an artist who enriches Hungarian culture with their literary translation activities and contributes to its international promotion' since 2011, and it is Peter Sherwood; see also the hlo report, Peter Sherwood Wins 2020 Árpád Tóth Translation Award.
       The only one of his translations under review at the complete review is that of The Finno-Ugrian Vampire, by Szécsi Noémi.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



12 September 2020 - Saturday

Prix Médicis longlists | Thomas Mann's library

       Prix Médicis longlists

       They've announced the longlists for the prix Médicis, a leading French literary prize that honors both a best French work and a best work in translation; see, for example, the Livres Hebdo report.
       Fifteen titles made the cut for the French-language work prize, including works by Emmanuel Carrère, Hervé Le Tellier, Simon Liberati, and Laurent Mauvignier.
       The thirteen-title strong longlist for translated works is dominated by translations from the English -- and includes Claro's translation of Lucy Ellmann's Ducks, Newburyport. But no translations from the Italian or German, much less anything non-European. But two translations from the Icelandic .....
       The shortlist will be announced 2 October.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Thomas Mann's library

       The 4300 volumes of Thomas Mann's personal library are, oddly enough, at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (yes, the school Einstein went to, but it is a technical university), and they've now digitized all the annotations he made in these, with markings in some sixty percent of them; see, for example, the press release on Marginalia in Thomas Mann's personal library.
       You can see and search the annotated pages from the library here -- though unfortunately many of the annotations aren't accessible online, for copyright mentions. Many of the annotations are simple line or passage-markings -- a line alongside the printed text -- so it's not always that exciting, but the digitized presentation is pretty impressive; I hope more libraries do this with their personal-library holdings.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



11 September 2020 - Friday

Baillie Gifford Prize longlist | 'Modern Indian Classics in Translation'
Who We're Reading When We're Reading Murakami review

       Baillie Gifford Prize longlist

       They've announced the longlist for this year's Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction, a £50,000 British prize.
       The shortlist will be announced 15 October, and the winner on 24 November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       'Modern Indian Classics in Translation'

       At Electric Literature Aruni Kashyap suggests 15 Modern Indian Classics in Translation.
       Five of them are under review at the complete review -- The Crooked Line, Cuckold, The Gift of a Cow, River of Fire , and Samskara -- but I'd certainly love to see some of the rest of these. Translations from the Assamese !

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Who We're Reading When We're Reading Murakami review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of David Karashima explaining Who We're Reading When We're Reading Murakami, recently out from Soft Skull.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



10 September 2020 - Thursday

Women's Prize for Fiction | Top 10 Soviet sci-fi writers ?
Wilhelm Raabe-Literaturpreis shortlist

       Women's Prize for Fiction

       They've announced the winner of this year's Women's Prize for Fiction -- the leading UK prize for fiction written by women, previously also known as the Orange Prize and the Baileys Women's Prize -- and it is Hamnet, by Maggie O'Farrell.

       I haven't seen this one yet, but it does sound intriguing; see also the publicity pages from Tinder Press and Alfred A. Knopf, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Top 10 Soviet sci-fi writers ?

       At Russia Beyond Valeria Paikova offers a list of the Top 10 Greatest Soviet sci-fi writers.
       The biggest surprise is that the Strugatsky-brothers don't rate the top spot -- though they do get the runner-up spot. Instead, it's Ivan Yefremov who tops the list. Quite a bit of his work has been translated into English, and he was undoubtedly a very influential figure, but the best ... ?
       Only work by the Strugatsky's is under review at the complete review -- see, for example, Roadside Picnic -- but I would certainly love to get to some these other authors as well.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Wilhelm Raabe-Literaturpreis shortlist

       The €30,000 Wilhelm Raabe Literary Prize is one of the biggest German book prizes -- with several of the previous winners under review at the complete review (Wolf Haas' The Weather Fifteen Years Ago (2006), Sibylle Lewitscharoff's Blumenberg (2011), Christian Kracht's Imperium (2012)) -- and they've now announced their five-title shortlist -- with four of the five titles also found on the just-announced longlist for the German Book Prize, with only Anna Katharina Hahn's Aus und davon not having gotten the nod there.
       The winner will be announced in early November.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



go to archive

- return to top of the page -


© 2020 the complete review

the Complete Review
Main | the New | the Best | the Rest | Review Index | Links